Science Days Program


Day 1: 08 JULY 2021


13:00 – 14:00 CEST     Plenary Session

SESSION 1: SCIENCE FOR THE FOOD SYSTEMS SUMMIT: UNLOCKING THE POTENTIAL OF SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION (STI) FOR TRANSFORMATION OF FOOD SYSTEMS

This session will set the stage for Science Days, and will focus on the role of STI in transforming food systems, on the evolving state of the art of STI, on how to unlock the potential of STI, and on setting the agenda for science to accelerate the transformation of food systems to contribute to achieving the SDGs, especially SDG2.

14:00 – 14:15 CEST     Transition from Plenary to Parallel Sessions

14:15 – 15:30 CEST     Parallel Sessions

SESSION 2: SCIENCE AS ACTION: SCIENCE-BASED OPTIONS TO ACHIEVE more healthy diets and more inclusive, SUSTAINABLE, AND resilient food systems

2A. Achieving more healthy diets in food systems – STI for affordable and accessible nutritious foods for healthy diets

This session will focus on science, technology, policy and institutional innovations to enhance productivity, incentivize availability, affordability, and uptake of nutritious and safe foods such as through diversified production systems, taxes, subsidies, regulation, labelling, food fortification, pricing – what is working and what is not in what contexts, and what are the key knowledge and evidence gaps that must be addressed.

2B. Achieving more inclusive food systems – STI for eliminating hunger and poverty and for advancing equitable livelihoods

This session will focus on science, technology, policy and institutional innovations to eliminate hunger, malnutrition and poverty and to advance equitable livelihoods, such as through improving smallholder productivity,  overcoming inefficient and unfair land, credit, and labor arrangements, advancing rights-based approaches, and facilitating greater inclusion and empowerment of marginalized groups – what is working and what is not in what contexts, and what are key knowledge and evidence gaps that must be addressed.

2C. Achieving more sustainable and resilient food systems – STI for making sustainable use of natural resources and managing and preventing risks and crises, incl. climate change and COVID-19

This session will focus on science, technology, policy and institutional innovations to achieve more sustainable and resilient terrestrial and marine-based food systems and to foster more climate-neutral, climate-positive, and climate-resilient food systems such as through transforming agronomic, ecological, livestock, forestry and fisheries practices; enhancing productivity; protecting and regenerating productive soils, land, and water; reducing food loss and waste; protecting biodiversity; reducing risk through novel insurance products and early warning systems and through innovative finance and social protection programs – what is working and what is not in what contexts, and what are key knowledge and evidence gaps that must be addressed; and how do related sustainability actions impact on nutrition, poverty, hunger i.e. how to address trade-offs.

15:30 – 16:45 CEST     Parallel Sessions

SESSION 3: PUTTING SCIENCE TO WORK: SCIENCE, PEOPLE AND POLICY

3A. Strengthening the science-policy interface across disciplines and policy areas incl.  economics, and health-, nutrition-, climate-, ecological-sciences

This session will focus on how to strengthen the science-policy interface at national and international levels to enable food systems transformation – what are effective mechanisms to connect knowledge from science (e.g. economics, health, climate, ecology and more) with policy action, how governments and private sector can support food systems science, how science can support effective policymaking, how international sharing of science can be facilitated including through new or strengthened international scientific bodies and their linkages with national and regional counterparts; what platforms can they use to better coordinate their engagement; what methods can they use to better integrate their sciences.

3B. Investing in institutional and human capacity for science and innovation

This session will focus on what type of investments are needed to strengthen institutional and human capacity to enable food systems transformation — how to encourage and support these investments within and across disciplines and geographies; how to support basic science and applied science / natural science and social science; and what mechanisms to push the frontiers of science.

3C. Capitalizing on models, data, and communications revolutions, and new methods

This session will focus on how we can capitalize on and further expand investments in models, data, methods, and communications to enable food systems transformation – what type of models and modelling platforms do we need for food systems; what innovations are happening / should happen to speed up (big) data availability, utilization, analysis and effective use in decision-making; how do we creatively tap into the communications revolution; what new methods are being developed within and outside food systems science that can be creatively put to work to push the frontier of knowledge.

16:45 – 17:00 CEST     Transition from Parallel to Plenary Sessions

17:00 – 18:00 CEST     Plenary Session

SESSION 4: WHY THE FIGHT: GETTING TO GRIPS WITH MISSED OPPORTUNITIES AND CONTENTIOUS ISSUES IN SCIENCE AND INNOVATION FOR FOOD SYSTEMS

This session will explore causes of important lingering and emerging food systems related science controversies, as well as missed opportunities in STI for food systems transformation, and discuss the role of research to address such controversies and move beyond polarization.

 

Day 2: 09 JULY 2021


13:00 – 14:00 CEST     Plenary Session

SESSION 5: ACHIEVING THE 2030 GOALS: OPPORTUNITIES, TRADE-OFFS, OBSTACLES AND SYNERGIES

This session will, drawing upon global foresight models and scenario exercises, look ahead to the world in 2030 – what will it take to achieve the SDGs especially SGD2 and how much will it cost; what do different scenarios offer under differing conditions/ assumption; what are the key trade-offs and synergies to look out for; what are the key opportunities to tap.

14:00 – 14:15 CEST     Transition from Plenary to Parallel Sessions

14:15 – 15:30 CEST     Parallel Sessions

SESSION 6: EMPOWERING AND ENGAGING KEY PLAYERS IN FOOD SYSTEM INNOVATION

6A. Youth

This session will focus on how to effectively and appropriately engage, include, incentivize, and empower youth in science and innovation for food systems transformations.

6B. Traditional and indigenous knowledge

This session will focus on how to effectively and appropriately support and use traditional and indigenous peoples’ knowledge and facilitate access and benefit sharing.

6C. Science in and by food industry and start-ups

This session will focus on how to effectively and appropriately support and use science in and by food industry and start-ups, and to foster partnerships that serve achieving the SDGs between food industry science and public sector, academia and civil society science.

6D. Women

This session will focus on strengthening rights, and how to effectively and appropriately engage, include, and empower women in science and innovation for food systems transformation.

15:30 – 16:45 CEST     Parallel Sessions

SESSION 7: BRAVE NEW WORLD: PUSHING THE FRONTIERS OF SCIENCE FOR FOOD SYSTEMS

7A. Bio-science innovations

This session will focus on the frontiers of science for food systems, in this case on the frontiers of bio-science innovations such as genome editing, synthetic biology, microbiomes, alternative protein sources, alternative sources for essential micronutrients, cell factories and more – what are the important new and emerging bio-science innovations, what will it take to put them effectively to work to transform food systems, and what are potential risks and unintended consequences.

7B. Digital innovations

This session will focus on the frontiers of science for food systems, in this case on the frontiers of digital innovations such as artificial intelligence, machine learning, Internet of Things, remote sensing, big data analysis, robotics, and more – what are the important new and emerging digital innovations, what will it take to put them effectively to work to transform food systems, and what are potential risks and unintended consequences, and ethical implications.

7C. Policy and institutional innovations

This session will focus on the frontiers of research on policy and institutional innovations such as financing the actions for food systems transformations, repurposing subsidies, innovating taxes, designing regulations, facilitating collective action, governing common goods, revising gender norms, improving market functioning, re-assessing the price and value of food and more – what are the important new and emerging policy innovations, what will it take to put them effectively to work to transform food systems, and what are potential risks and unintended consequences.

16:45 – 17:00 CEST     Transition from Parallel to Plenary Sessions

17:00 – 18:00 CET       Plenary Session

SESSION 8: LOOKING AHEAD: STRATEGIC FOOD SYSTEMS SCIENCE BEYOND 2030

This session will close the Science Days with reflections on the long-term (beyond 2030) issues, opportunities, and challenges for science, technology and innovation, with special consideration given to ethical issues, nutritional issues, equity issues, rights and justice issues, culture issues, demographics, risk management issues, and international scientific cooperation.